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The Telecom Digest for September 25, 2013
Volume 32 : Issue 200 : "text" Format
Messages in this Issue:
Step Away From the Phone! (Monty Solomon)
Jony Ive: The man behind Apple's magic curtain (Monty Solomon)
IOS 7 Lockscreen Bug Allows Anyone to Sidestep Passcode, Access Photos/Email (Monty Solomon)
The iPhone 5s Review (Monty Solomon)

====== 32 years of TELECOM Digest -- Founded August 21, 1981 ======

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Date: Sun, 22 Sep 2013 17:40:18 -0400 From: Monty Solomon <monty@roscom.com> To: telecomdigestmoderator.remove-this@and-this-too.telecom-digest.org. Subject: Step Away From the Phone! Message-ID: <p06240838ce651406ac98@[]> Step Away From the Phone! By CAROLINE TELL September 20, 2013 Whenever Michael Carl, the fashion market director at Vanity Fair, goes out to dinner with friends, he plays something called the "phone stack" game: Everyone places their phones in the middle of the table; whoever looks at their device before the check arrives picks up the tab. Brandon Holley, the former editor of Lucky magazine, had trouble ditching her iPhone when she got home from work. So about six months ago, she began tossing her phone into a vintage milk tin the moment she walked in. It remains there until after dinner. And Marc Jacobs, the fashion designer, didn't want to sleep next to a beeping gizmo. So he banned digital devices from his bedroom, a house rule he shared with audiences during a recent screening of "Disconnect," a film that dramatizes how technology has alienated people from one other. As smartphones continue to burrow their way into our lives, and wearable devices like Google Glass threaten to erode our personal space even further, overtaxed users are carving out their own device-free zones with ad hoc tricks and life hacks. Whether it's a physical barrier (no iPads at the dinner table) or a conceptual one (turn off devices by 11 p.m.), users say these weaning techniques are improving their relationships - and their sanity. ... http://www.nytimes.com/2013/09/22/fashion/step-away-from-the-phone.html ***** Moderator's Note ***** I think I've been saying this for years. Nice to know someone listened. ;-) Bill Horne Moderator
Date: Sun, 22 Sep 2013 17:42:04 -0400 From: Monty Solomon <monty@roscom.com> To: telecomdigestmoderator.remove-this@and-this-too.telecom-digest.org. Subject: Jony Ive: The man behind Apple's magic curtain Message-ID: <p06240826ce6506e79939@[]> Jony Ive: The man behind Apple's magic curtain Marco della Cava USA TODAY September 19, 2013 The reclusive and prolific Jony Ive, the man behind the Apple iPod, meets with USA TODAY for a rare interview about Apple's once and future mission. http://www.usatoday.com/story/tech/2013/09/19/apple-jony-ive-craig-federighi/2834575/
Date: Sun, 22 Sep 2013 17:42:04 -0400 From: Monty Solomon <monty@roscom.com> To: telecomdigestmoderator.remove-this@and-this-too.telecom-digest.org. Subject: IOS 7 Lockscreen Bug Allows Anyone to Sidestep Passcode, Access Photos/Email Message-ID: <p06240827ce65074eb15d@[]> IOS 7 Lockscreen Bug Allows Anyone to Sidestep Passcode, Access Photos/Email Tiffany Kaiser September 20, 2013 Apple is working on a fix now Apple just released its latest operating system yesterday -- iOS 7 -- and as expected with new releases, users are finding bugs. The most recent find allows anyone to bypass an iPhone user's lockscreen and access their photos, Twitter, email and more. According to Forbes, Jose Rodriguez -- a 36-year-old soldier from Spain's Canary Islands -- found the lockscreen vulnerability in his free time. He is known for finding lockscreen security flaws in previous versions of iOS as well. The lockscreen flaw in iOS 7 allows someone to bypass the passcode screen entirely by swiping up to access the "Control Center," and opening the alarm clock. They then hold the phone's sleep button down -- which offers the option to power it off -- but instead, they hit "cancel" and double click the home button to access the multitasking screen. >From there, it's free access to the iPhone's camera and photos, as well as options to share them through Twitter, Facebook and email. Check it out in this video: ... http://www.dailytech.com/IOS+7+Lockscreen+Bug+Allows+Anyone+to+Sidestep+Passcode+Access+PhotosEmail/article33416.htm
Date: Sun, 22 Sep 2013 17:42:04 -0400 From: Monty Solomon <monty@roscom.com> To: telecomdigestmoderator.remove-this@and-this-too.telecom-digest.org. Subject: The iPhone 5s Review Message-ID: <p06240825ce65034fc1b7@[]> The iPhone 5s Review by Anand Lal Shimpi September 17, 2013 For much of the iPhone's life Apple has enjoyed a first-mover advantage. At the launch of the first iPhone, Steve Jobs expected the device and OS would give it a multi-year head start over the competition. Indeed that's how the market played out. Although Android was met with some early success, it wasn't until well after the launch of the first Android devices that we started seeing broad, mainstream acceptance of the platform. The iPhone bought Apple time, and together with the iPad it brought Apple a tremendous amount of profit over the years. The trick of course is turning a first-mover advantage into an indefinitely dominant market position, a difficult task when you're only making one device a year. Today we find Apple in a very different position. The iPhone is still loved by a very loyal customer base, but the competition is much stronger than it was back in 2007. The modern smartphone market has also evolved. When Apple introduced the original iPhone with its 3.5" display, Steve called it "giant" on stage. Today even HTC's One mini ships with a 4.3" display. Last year we saw Apple begin to address the changing landscape with the iPhone 5. The 5 saw Apple moving to a thinner, lighter chassis with much better internals and a significantly larger display. While there is market demand for Apple to do the same again, and move to an even larger display, there are some traditions Apple is sticking to. In this case, it's the tradition of the S-update. The iPhone 5s continues Apple's tradition of introducing a performance focused upgrade for the last year of any new chassis design. The first time we encountered an S-update was with the 3GS, which took the iPhone away from its sluggish ARM11 roots and into the world of the Cortex A8. The next S-upgrade came with the iPhone 4S: Apple's first smartphone to use a dual-core SoC. At the time I remember debate over whether or not a performance upgrade alone was enough to sell a new device, especially one that didn't look any different. I'm pretty much never happy with the performance I have, so I eagerly welcomed the new platform. Looking back at the iPhone 4 vs. 4S today, I'd say the investment was probably worth it. In preparation for this review I threw iOS 7 on every iPhone that would support it, dating back to the iPhone 4. In my experience, the 4 is a bit too slow running iOS 7 - the 4S really should be the minimum requirement from a performance standpoint. That brings us to the iPhone 5s, the third in a list of S-upgrades to the iPhone platform. Like the S-devices that came before it, the iPhone 5s is left in the unfortunate position of not being able to significantly differentiate itself visually from its predecessor. This time around Apple has tried to make things a bit better by offering the 5s in new finishes. While the iPhone 5 launched in silver and black options, the 5s retains silver, replaces black with a new space grey and adds a third, gold finish. ... http://www.anandtech.com/show/7335/the-iphone-5s-review
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