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The Telecom Digest for July 2, 2013
Volume 32 : Issue 143 : "text" Format
Messages in this Issue:
Job Title Key to Inner Access Held by Snowden (Monty Solomon)
Privacy in an age of publicity. (Monty Solomon)
Re: Walmart cellphone plans? (Matt Simpson)

====== 31 years of TELECOM Digest -- Founded August 21, 1981 ======

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Date: Mon, 1 Jul 2013 00:50:06 -0400 From: Monty Solomon <monty@roscom.com> To: telecomdigestmoderator.remove-this@and-this-too.telecom-digest.org. Subject: Job Title Key to Inner Access Held by Snowden Message-ID: <p06240805cdf6ba9ab81a@[]> Job Title Key to Inner Access Held by Snowden By SCOTT SHANE and DAVID E. SANGER June 30, 2013 WASHINGTON - Intelligence officials refer to Edward J. Snowden's job as a National Security Agency contractor as "systems administrator" - a bland name for the specialists who keep the computers humming. But his last job before leaking classified documents about N.S.A. surveillance, he told the news organization The Guardian, was actually "infrastructure analyst." It is a title that officials have carefully avoided mentioning, perhaps for fear of inviting questions about the agency's aggressive tactics: an infrastructure analyst at the N.S.A., like a burglar casing an apartment building, looks for new ways to break into Internet and telephone traffic around the world. That assignment helps explain how Mr. Snowden got hold of documents laying bare the top-secret capabilities of the nation's largest intelligence agency, setting off a far-reaching political and diplomatic crisis for the Obama administration. Even as some members of Congress have challenged the N.S.A.'s collection of logs of nearly every phone call Americans make, European officials furiously protested on Sunday after Mr. Snowden's disclosure that the N.S.A. has bugged European Union offices in Washington and Brussels and, with its British counterpart, has tapped the Continent's major fiber-optic communications cables. On Sunday evening, The Guardian posted an article saying documents leaked by Mr. Snowden show 38 embassies and missions on a list of United States electronic surveillance targets. Some of those offices belong to allies like France, Italy, Japan and Mexico, The Guardian said. Mr. Snowden, who planned his leaks for at least a year, has said he took the infrastructure analyst position with Booz Allen Hamilton in Hawaii in March, evidently taking a pay cut, to gain access to a fresh supply of documents. ... http://www.nytimes.com/2013/07/01/us/job-title-key-to-inner-access-held-by-snowden.html?pagewanted=all
Date: Mon, 1 Jul 2013 00:57:46 -0400 From: Monty Solomon <monty@roscom.com> To: telecomdigestmoderator.remove-this@and-this-too.telecom-digest.org. Subject: Privacy in an age of publicity. Message-ID: <p06240806cdf6bb94f2b6@[]> THE PRISM Privacy in an age of publicity. BY Jill Lepore June 24, 2013 The New Yorker An extraordinary fuss about eavesdropping started in the spring of 1844, when Giuseppe Mazzini, an Italian exile in London, became convinced that the British government was opening his mail. Mazzini, a revolutionary who'd been thrown in jail in Genoa, imprisoned in Savona, sentenced to death in absentia, and arrested in Paris, was plotting the unification of the kingdoms of Italy and the founding of an Italian republic. He suspected that, in London, he'd been the victim of what he called "post-office espionage": he believed that the Home Secretary, Sir James Graham, had ordered his mail to be opened, at the request of the Austrian Ambassador, who, like many people, feared what Mazzini hoped-that an insurrection in Italy would spark a series of revolutions across Europe. Mazzini knew how to find out: he put poppy seeds, strands of hair, and grains of sand into envelopes, sealed the envelopes with wax, and sent them, by post, to himself. When the letters arrived-still sealed-they contained no poppy seeds, no hair, and no grains of sand. Mazzini then had his friend Thomas Duncombe, a Member of Parliament, submit a petition to the House of Commons. Duncombe wanted to know if Graham really had ordered the opening of Mazzini's mail. Was the British government in the business of prying into people's private correspondence? Graham said the answer to that question was a secret. Questions raised this month about surveillance conducted by the National Security Agency have been met, so far, with much the same response that Duncombe got from Graham in 1844: the program is classified. (This, a secret secret, is known as a double secret.) Luckily, old secrets aren't secret; old secrets are history. The Mazzini affair, as the historian David Vincent argued in "The Culture of Secrecy," led to "the first modern attack on official secrecy." It stirred a public uproar, and eventually the House of Commons appointed a Committee of Secrecy "to inquire into the State of the Law in respect of the Detaining and Opening of Letters at the General Post-office, and into the Mode under which the Authority given for such Detaining and Opening has been exercised." In August of 1844, the committee issued a hundred-and-sixteen-page report on the goings on at the post office. Fascinating to historians, it must have bored Parliament silly. It includes a history of the delivery of the mail, back to the sixteenth century. (The committee members had "showed so much antiquarian research," Lord John Russell remarked, that he was surprised they hadn't gone all the way back to "the case of Hamlet, Prince of Denmark, who opened the letters which had been committed to his charge, and got Rosencrantz and Guildenstern put to death instead of himself.") The report revealed that Mazzini's mail had indeed been opened and that there existed something called the Secret Department of the Post Office. Warrants had been issued for reading the mail of the king's subjects for centuries. Before Mazzini and the poppy seeds, the practice was scarcely questioned. It was not, however, widespread. "The general average of Warrants issued during the present century, does not much exceed 8 a-year," the investigation revealed. "This number would comprehend, on an average, the Letters of about 16 persons annually." The Committee of Secrecy was relieved to report that rumors that the Secret Department of the Post Office had, at times, sent "entire mail-bags" to the Home Office were false: "None but separate Letters or Packets are ever sent." The entire episode was closely watched in the United States, where the New-York Tribune condemned the opening of Mazzini's mail as "a barbarian breach of honor and decency." After the Committee of Secrecy issued its report, Mazzini published an essay called "Letter-Opening at the Post-Office." Two months after the Mazzini affair began, the Secret Department of the Post Office was abolished. What replaced it, in the long run, was even sneakier: better-kept secrets. ... http://www.newyorker.com/reporting/2013/06/24/130624fa_fact_lepore?currentPage=all
Date: Sun, 30 Jun 2013 23:11:15 -0400 From: Matt Simpson <net-news69@jmatt.net> To: telecomdigestmoderator.remove-this@and-this-too.telecom-digest.org. Subject: Re: Walmart cellphone plans? Message-ID: <net-news69-5A165A.23111430062013@news.eternal-september.org> In article <1c6wh4qt1jgxk.blvl8borb2ob.dlg@40tude.net>, tlvp <mPiOsUcB.EtLlLvEp@att.net> wrote: > Another "off-brand carrier" (actually, MVNO) is Page Plus Cellular, > > > https://www.pagepluscellular.com/ > , > Their plans are good for people who talk a lot. Nobody sells plans for introverted geeks like me that use lots of data but don't talk to anybody. To get lots of data, I'd have to buy unlimited talk/text that I'd never use. Actually, my existing AT&T plan fits my needs nicely, but it's a grandfathered plan that's not available any more. I get unlimited data, 100 minutes talk, no text, for about $40 ($38.25 plus the BS misc. fees). With a couple of Google Voice apps, I can send texts and make/receive VOIP calls using my unlimited data. Only downside is when people send texts to my cell # instead of my GV number. I never get the message and the sender doesn't get an error.
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