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The Telecom Digest for December 27, 2010
Volume 29 : Issue 350 : "text" Format

Messages in this Issue:

Providing Caller ID with Name (was: Number portability and the demise of line number pools in bankruptcy)(Adam H. Kerman)
Re: Please don't hit me with your modem(Gary)
Re: No Signal: Homes Often Baffle Wi-Fi From Routers(John Mayson)
Re: No Signal: Homes Often Baffle Wi-Fi From Routers(Dave Garland)
Re: No Signal: Homes Often Baffle Wi-Fi From Routers(GlowingBlueMist)
Re: No Signal: Homes Often Baffle Wi-Fi From Routers(John Levine)
Re: No Signal: Homes Often Baffle Wi-Fi From Routers(John Mayson)
Verizon's FiOS(Ann O'Nymous)
The Gawker hack: how a million passwords were lost(Monty Solomon)
Re: Please don't hit me with your modem(Frank Stearns)
Re: Please don't hit me with your modem(John Mayson)
Re: ZIP Codes and barcodes(Adam H. Kerman)
Re: ZIP Codes and barcodes(Lisa or Jeff)
Re: Number portability and the demise of line number pools in bankruptcy (David Clayton)
Re: Number portability and the demise of line number pools in bankruptcy (John Mayson)
Re: Fortifying Phones From Attackers(Eric Tappert)
Re: Fortifying Phones From Attackers(harold@hallikainen.com)


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Date: Sat, 25 Dec 2010 23:26:31 +0000 (UTC) From: "Adam H. Kerman" <ahk@chinet.com> To: telecomdigestmoderator.remove-this@and-this-too.telecom-digest.org. Subject: Providing Caller ID with Name (was: Number portability and the demise of line number pools in bankruptcy) Message-ID: <if5uj7$kjp$1@news.albasani.net> Dave Garland <dave.garland@wizinfo.com> wrote: >On 12/24/2010 4:43 PM, Dan Lanciani wrote: >>How does portability interact with caller name delivery? >My recent experience with VoIP was interesting. A number issued by >the voip company (voip.ms) had CID "Minnesota Call". The voip vendor >said that they were unable to change that, apparently the CNAM record >was not under their control. So we ported a number from Qwest. The >voip vendor said that CNAM might stay the same but they could not >guarantee it. For an additional fee, I could have CNAM set to >whatever I wanted, and the likelihood of success would be higher, but >still not guaranteed (although if they were not successful I would not >be charged the fee). Ah, yes, you got the excuse of the day. Anyway, you won't know there is a problem until you call from the number in question to phones subscribed to various services, including other VoIP providers, the cable company, or anyone you know who still subscribes to POTS. In my experience, when porting a telephone number to another carrier from POTS, the ILEC immediately purged the cached Caller ID with Name record from its database, so if a call from that number on the new network calls a number on the ILEC's network, a new database dip is performed if those two networks have agreed to exchange Caller ID with Name records. For VoIP providers that participate in providing Caller ID with Name records associated with outbound calls of their own subscribers, which is a money-making opportunity for them, they tend to use a third party to to maintain and sell these records. They also consult this third party's database's cached Caller ID with Name records, instead of paying for a dip into the database of the network the call originated on. It can be difficult getting these caches purged. In my family, a number that began as POTS was ported. Also, the billing name changed. When calling from that number into a number provided by Comcast, the former billing name showed up. Now, the subscriber whose call was misidentified couldn't complain to Comcast, but it had to be corrected with a complain made by a Comcast voice subscriber. Alas, Comcast refused to simply purge the cache and kept insisting on entering information into the field to avoid paying for the new dip. Twice they entered meaningless or incorrect information. Needless to say, complaining about these incorrect cached records that live on indefinitely is so difficult, almost no one does it. It's not as if you, yourself, can check the cached record of your phone number yourself or even deal with networks foreign to your own. In your situation, yes, your VoIP provider does have the ability to update the Caller ID with Name record its third party vendor provides when you make an outbound call from that line. That they should guarantee absolutely and not make excuses for being unable to do so. They cannot guarantee that the Caller ID with Name information displayed to the called party will be the current record or a cached record with incorrect information. They may be creating part of the problem themselves. When they close an account or when a number is ported out of their pool, they should notify their third-party Caller ID with Name database provider that the record should be purged immediately, but no one but ILECs seem to do that. Some minimal FCC accuracy standards would be nice.
Date: Sat, 25 Dec 2010 19:31:30 -0500 From: "Gary" <bogus-email@hotmail.com> To: telecomdigestmoderator.remove-this@and-this-too.telecom-digest.org. Subject: Re: Please don't hit me with your modem Message-ID: <if62d8$orc$1@news.eternal-september.org> > ***** Moderator's Note ***** > > The Sword Of Satire [tm] cuts both ways: I still have a modem, and I > still remember a couple of Hayes commands, and I have been in the > business for more than thirty years. I'm going to put the strip up > over my desk to remind me that when it comes to technology, the rule > is "Never Look Back". The interesting bit is that the folks who "never look back" often end up re-inventing the wheel; albeit with shinier hub-caps. -Gary
Date: Sat, 25 Dec 2010 19:05:00 -0600 From: John Mayson <john@mayson.us> To: telecomdigestmoderator.remove-this@and-this-too.telecom-digest.org. Subject: Re: No Signal: Homes Often Baffle Wi-Fi From Routers Message-ID: <AANLkTikGgRgoFrVveicNHdP7QAbDZaJrPQvo83S3WUEv@mail.gmail.com> On Fri, Dec 24, 2010 at 11:35 PM, Monty Solomon <monty@roscom.com> wrote: > > No Signal: Homes Often Baffle Wi-Fi From Routers I'm glad it's not just me. While my house is large by global standards, it's hardly a McMansion. I have mine set to a channel with no other devices nearby. Yet I still have hard to explain dead spots in my house, some even in the same room as my wireless router. I have tried every tweak I can find and nothing really helps. And this brings me to another issue. I keep my wireless router hidden because I simply cannot tolerate the nonstop blinking LEDs. The first vendor to create a router that allows users to turn off the LEDs will forever have my business. I assume they don't because it's an added expense and something else a user could complain about (e.g. user turns off the LEDs, doesn't realize it, and thinks the device is dead). Perhaps it's something they could bury that only a power user like myself would ever find. John -- John Mayson <john@mayson.us> Austin, Texas, USA
Date: Sun, 26 Dec 2010 12:51:56 -0600 From: Dave Garland <dave.garland@wizinfo.com> To: telecomdigestmoderator.remove-this@and-this-too.telecom-digest.org. Subject: Re: No Signal: Homes Often Baffle Wi-Fi From Routers Message-ID: <if82q3$oq9$1@news.eternal-september.org> On 12/25/2010 7:05 PM, John Mayson wrote: > I keep my wireless router hidden > because I simply cannot tolerate the nonstop blinking LEDs. The first > vendor to create a router that allows users to turn off the LEDs will > forever have my business. There's always the "Click and Clack Idiot Light" solution. A small piece of black electrical tape can be placed over the light to make it go away. I mostly don't mind blinking lights so long as they're not in my direct field of vision, though the glaring (non-blinking) blue LED on the front of my monitor got a filter of typing paper darkened with pencil lead, to reduce the icepick-in-the-eye effect. Dave
Date: Sun, 26 Dec 2010 14:34:00 -0600 From: GlowingBlueMist <GlowingBlueMist@truely.invalid.dotsrc.org> To: telecomdigestmoderator.remove-this@and-this-too.telecom-digest.org. Subject: Re: No Signal: Homes Often Baffle Wi-Fi From Routers Message-ID: <4d17a6b7$0$23759$14726298@news.sunsite.dk> On 12/25/2010 7:05 PM, John Mayson wrote: > On Fri, Dec 24, 2010 at 11:35 PM, Monty Solomon<monty@roscom.com> wrote: >> >> No Signal: Homes Often Baffle Wi-Fi From Routers > > I'm glad it's not just me. > > While my house is large by global standards, it's hardly a McMansion. > I have mine set to a channel with no other devices nearby. Yet I > still have hard to explain dead spots in my house, some even in the > same room as my wireless router. I have tried every tweak I can find > and nothing really helps. > > And this brings me to another issue. I keep my wireless router hidden > because I simply cannot tolerate the nonstop blinking LEDs. The first > vendor to create a router that allows users to turn off the LEDs will > forever have my business. I assume they don't because it's an added > expense and something else a user could complain about (e.g. user > turns off the LEDs, doesn't realize it, and thinks the device is > dead). Perhaps it's something they could bury that only a power user > like myself would ever find. > > John > When I used to work in the USA home building trade I would see home after home insulated with fiberglass insulation backed by aluminum foil. Most times this was used on the outside walls, one reason why your cell phone might only work near a window, but in many homes it was used on interior walls as well. For those walls that needed to pass water vapor most contractors in my area would make a slash in the foil. That would allow vapor through but the slash was usually only the width of the knife used in making the slash. These walls would continue to be a very good reflector of radio signals, or a blocker depending on which side of the wall a router is on. With a router's signal and a PC being inside a foil wrapped room the reflecting signal can actually be too high for a computer's radio receiver to properly handle it or can cause it to become so distorted that it can not be decoded reliably. Trying an alternative router software like DDWRT, if the router is supported, may alleviate a problem since it usually allows the signal level to be lowered, or raised at the router. Raising the signal level higher than factory levels may require the addition of a cooling fan so as to not burn out the transmitter. /// GBM
Date: 26 Dec 2010 19:20:43 -0000 From: John Levine <johnl@iecc.com> To: telecomdigestmoderator.remove-this@and-this-too.telecom-digest.org. Subject: Re: No Signal: Homes Often Baffle Wi-Fi From Routers Message-ID: <20101226192043.1963.qmail@joyce.lan> >And this brings me to another issue. I keep my wireless router hidden >because I simply cannot tolerate the nonstop blinking LEDs. Isn't that why they invented duct tape? R's, John
Date: Sun, 26 Dec 2010 13:25:54 -0600 From: John Mayson <john@mayson.us> To: telecomdigestmoderator.remove-this@and-this-too.telecom-digest.org. Subject: Re: No Signal: Homes Often Baffle Wi-Fi From Routers Message-ID: <AANLkTinbSupEZSucXOwQXKn0QPg6mWhE_J8DMGaTS5pb@mail.gmail.com> On Sun, Dec 26, 2010 at 1:20 PM, John Levine <johnl@iecc.com> wrote: >>And this brings me to another issue. ¬ I keep my wireless router >>hidden because I simply cannot tolerate the nonstop blinking LEDs. > > Isn't that why they invented duct tape? It still shines through. And perhaps I'm overly sensitive. I usually sleep like very soundly. I have slept through many thunderstorms and even a transformer exploding right outside my hotel bedroom window. But last night I woke up thinking the room was on fire. It turned out being the email notification LED on my wife's new phone. It was bright enough to wake me up from being sound asleep. Not knowing me that might not mean much, but I'm telling you it takes a lot to wake me up. John -- John Mayson <john@mayson.us> Austin, Texas, USA
Date: Sun, 26 Dec 2010 09:19:07 -0500 From: Ann O'Nymous <nobody@nowhere.com> To: telecomdigestmoderator.remove-this@and-this-too.telecom-digest.org. Subject: Verizon's FiOS Message-ID: <if7isp$mof$1@speranza.aioe.org> How does FiOS (Verizon's fiber-to-the-home offering) work? I'm asking for information beyond the Wikipedia article. It states there are three optical channels, one for data up, one for data down, one for TV. Telephony (POTS) uses the data up/down channels. Is it a form of VOIP? I believe I saw mentioned the telephone hardware is simply a one-line version of equipment that telephone co's already use to bring fiber from a CO to a cabinet, and copper POTS the rest of the way to a neighborhood of customers. What protocol does this use? It mention they multiplex up to 32 customers' fibers onto a single fiber optically. Does this cause contention for limited IP bandwidth like what happens with a neighborhood of active cable modem users? How do they multiplex the "data up" channel so that multiple subscribers don't try to "transmit" their data at once? It mentions "video on demand" uses the data down channel, not the TV channel. Does this count against the IP bandwidth allowed? What protocol is this?
Date: Sun, 26 Dec 2010 11:54:14 -0500 From: Monty Solomon <monty@roscom.com> To: telecomdigestmoderator.remove-this@and-this-too.telecom-digest.org. Subject: The Gawker hack: how a million passwords were lost Message-ID: <p06240821c93d235f2d2d@[192.168.180.133]> The Gawker hack: how a million passwords were lost by Joseph Bonneau December 15, 2010 Almost a year to the date after the landmark RockYou password hack, we have seen another large password breach, this time of Gawker Media. While an order of magnitude smaller, it's still probably the second largest public compromise of a website's password file, and in many ways it's a more interesting case than RockYou. The story quickly made it to the mainstream press, but the reported details are vague and often wrong. I've obtained a copy of the data (which remains generally available, though Gawker is attempting to block listing of the torrent files) so I'll try to clarify the details of the leak and Gawker's password implementation (gleaned mostly from the readme file provided with the leaked data and from reverse engineering MySQL dumps). I'll discuss the actual password dataset in a future post. ... http://www.lightbluetouchpaper.org/2010/12/15/the-gawker-hack-how-a-million-passwords-were-lost/
Date: Sat, 25 Dec 2010 12:59:51 -0600 From: Frank Stearns <franks.pacifier.com@pacifier.net> To: telecomdigestmoderator.remove-this@and-this-too.telecom-digest.org. Subject: Re: Please don't hit me with your modem Message-ID: <Rqidna3iQ9O6oovQnZ2dnUVZ_o-dnZ2d@posted.palinacquisition> - snips - >***** Moderator's Note ***** >The Sword Of Satire [tm] cuts both ways: I still have a modem, and I >still remember a couple of Hayes commands, and I have been in the I still have an acoustic coupler on a shelf in the garage. Let's not go there about my age... I was, uh, ahead of the curve in nursery school. Frank -- .
Date: Sun, 26 Dec 2010 13:30:43 -0600 From: John Mayson <john@mayson.us> To: telecomdigestmoderator.remove-this@and-this-too.telecom-digest.org. Subject: Re: Please don't hit me with your modem Message-ID: <AANLkTimK1syCgsxObAeDtPuiSmecg1qsbS4Jnb0o-BaQ@mail.gmail.com> On Sat, Dec 25, 2010 at 12:59 PM, Frank Stearns <franks.pacifier.com@pacifier.net> wrote: > > I still have an acoustic coupler on a shelf in the garage. Let's not go there about > my age... I was, uh, ahead of the curve in nursery school. I have told people at work I remember AT&T being broken up in 1984 and they inform me they weren't born yet when that happened. It makes me want to start taking Geritol and join AARP. I was 14 years-old in January 1, 1984. -- John Mayson <john@mayson.us> Austin, Texas, USA
Date: Sat, 25 Dec 2010 22:36:34 +0000 (UTC) From: "Adam H. Kerman" <ahk@chinet.com> To: telecomdigestmoderator.remove-this@and-this-too.telecom-digest.org. Subject: Re: ZIP Codes and barcodes Message-ID: <if5rli$gjv$1@news.albasani.net> Adam H. Kerman <ahk@chinet.com> wrote: >Here's what happens with single-piece mail. There is something of a mixed >mail stream of letters and flats, although if there's time, mail handlers >will segregate outbound mail at the delivery unit before sending it to the >plant. Letters and flats have separate mail streams. Then letters hit the >facer-canceller machine. . . . That was sloppily written. Outgoing mail picked up by carriers and from street collection boxes is a mixed mail stream of letters and flats; generally, parcels are handled separately. The mail handler at the delivery unit does what he can to separate flats from letters and remove mail with no postage before sending it to the plant. He also tries to separate metered mail, which if it can be faced, is supposed to skip the cancelling step. At the plant, there are separate processing streams for letters and flats, although at the start of the process, any letters and flats still mixed together are mechanically segregated so that letters, only, head to the facer-canceller machines. Letter mail has little variation in facing: The delivery address block must be oriented toward the longest dimension and parallel to it and the postage area is in the upper right hand corner. At this point in the process, the machine detects the upper right hand corner by looking for the luminescent or phosphor tags on stamps (or the flourescent ink in meter marks as much metered mail never gets segregated from stamped mail to be cancelled) and orienting the mail, without looking for the address block. If FIM is present adjacent to the postage, then that mail is segregated into a mail stream to skip the encoding step as the POSTNET barcode is present. Flats have a different process for cancelling as the postage and delivery address block may appear in any of several areas, and facing of flats is little more than orienting the side with the postage and delivery address block "up".
Date: Sat, 25 Dec 2010 21:50:21 -0800 (PST) From: Lisa or Jeff <hancock4@bbs.cpcn.com> To: telecomdigestmoderator.remove-this@and-this-too.telecom-digest.org. Subject: Re: ZIP Codes and barcodes Message-ID: <356503bc-6180-4df8-b801-521db2050c49@n10g2000yqd.googlegroups.com> On Dec 25, 9:57†am, Wes Leatherock <wleat...@yahoo.com> wrote: > --- On Fri, 12/24/10, Lisa or Jeff <hanco...@bbs.cpcn.com> wrote: > > > For instance, the return envelope of bills often has a similar bar > > code on it, presumably to get it to the delivery address faster. > > > Thanks. > > But the return envelopes for bills also has a "Facing Identifing Mark" > FIM just to the left of the space for the stamp which tells the > equipment it has a Zip code already. The MS Word program puts that mark out as well.
Date: Sun, 26 Dec 2010 11:28:46 +1100 From: David Clayton <dcstar@myrealbox.com> To: telecomdigestmoderator.remove-this@and-this-too.telecom-digest.org. Subject: Re: Number portability and the demise of line number pools in bankruptcy Message-ID: <pan.2010.12.25.22.50.28.312619@myrealbox.com> Just a general question on the number portability of Cell services in the US, just how easy is it to change carriers and keep your number? In Australia it is the norm to basically be able to move between network providers and keep your number, with minimal (if any) downtime. The only issue that seems to arise is non-technical, where the new provider requires account details of the old service to verify that the number is actually yours and it is proper to take it over. -- Regards, David. David Clayton Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. Knowledge is a measure of how many answers you have, intelligence is a measure of how many questions you have.
Date: Sun, 26 Dec 2010 13:28:14 -0600 From: John Mayson <john@mayson.us> To: telecomdigestmoderator.remove-this@and-this-too.telecom-digest.org. Subject: Re: Number portability and the demise of line number pools in bankruptcy Message-ID: <AANLkTi=-ey1c0_7zmh9YszKwvSYqKxi+_-UVWHYewL+D@mail.gmail.com> On Sat, Dec 25, 2010 at 6:28 PM, David Clayton <dcstar@myrealbox.com> wrote: > Just a general question on the number portability of Cell services in the > US, just how easy is it to change carriers and keep your number? We moved from Sprint to AT&T in 2008 and it was seamless. No downtime that I'm aware of. -- John Mayson <john@mayson.us> Austin, Texas, USA
Date: Sat, 25 Dec 2010 20:18:04 -0500 From: Eric Tappert <e.tappert.spamnot@worldnet.att.net> To: telecomdigestmoderator.remove-this@and-this-too.telecom-digest.org. Subject: Re: Fortifying Phones From Attackers Message-ID: <fu4dh6hhkod6l4mnbkqtovj6d66ddoen8p@4ax.com> On Sat, 25 Dec 2010 00:35:17 -0500, Monty Solomon <monty@roscom.com> wrote: > >Fortifying Phones From Attackers >AT&T Hires Ph.Ds for Security Lab; Verizon Wireless Teams With >Start-Up on Data-Security App > >By SPENCER E. ANTE >DECEMBER 22, 2010 > >As consumers and companies embrace smartphones to do more of their >computing, the wireless industry is taking its first steps to beef up >security on mobile devices. > >A trader talked on his cellphone outside the New York Stock Exchange >in October. The wireless industry aims to beef up mobile security. > >Carriers are deploying new services and cutting deals with start-ups >to help protect people from malicious attacks and misuse of their >personal data stored on a smartphone. Meanwhile, handset makers and >chip firms are taking steps to fortify their hardware as the number >of attacks on mobile devices grows larger and more sophisticated. > >... > >http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748704774604576035960449272404.html Folks, Yea, right. The wireless companies really want to protect their customers... I have a Verizon phone that has been spam free for years, until a month ago. An obvious spam message (phishing, actually) showed up an I went to a Verizon store to complain. The clerk duly sent a "stop" message and said all was OK. At the end of the month I was charged for the spam message and the "stop" message. The good lad did show me how to block text messages from certain numbers, however. A second obvious spam message was received a couple of weeks later. I tried to block it, but it came from a "llist" that didn't have a 10 digit phone number, so it could not be blocked. It cost me two more text message charges. I complained to the store, but they didn't have any solution, except to send another text to stop the spam (and get charged for it). So, it appears that that wireless providers have a great source of revenue from spam, thus they don't want to stop it. My contract calls for per message charges. I don't mind the occasional note from my kids or a pictue of my grandkids and paying the freight, but to have to pay for spam and a message to "try" to stop it is a load of stuff out of the south end of a north bound bull. Wireless providers are really not intereseted in stopping illegal activity if they profit from it, If spam is OK, then personal info is clearlly at risk. ET
Date: Sun, 26 Dec 2010 12:13:10 -0800 (PST) From: "harold@hallikainen.com" <harold@hallikainen.com> To: telecomdigestmoderator.remove-this@and-this-too.telecom-digest.org. Subject: Re: Fortifying Phones From Attackers Message-ID: <57a78d72-3c71-42ec-8ea8-5c51a86dc250@a28g2000prb.googlegroups.com> My first cellphone required you to key in a number before it would place calls. This was to prevent accidental dials (it had an exposed keyboard). The number, though, was fixed (something like 1234). A great security feature would be to require a user to key in a PIN before "starting a session" on the phone except for receiving a call. My current phone has a PIN lock feature, but you have to go in and unlock, then relock the phone when you're done. It's a pain. It seems that it'd be real simple to have a user configurable PIN and a user configurable timeout. You could receive calls, but not make calls without starting the session with the PIN. Do any phones have such a feature? It seems that it would largely limit the market for stolen cellphones. Harold
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End of The Telecom Digest (17 messages)

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