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The Telecom Digest for October 14, 2010
Volume 29 : Issue 276 : "text" Format

Messages in this Issue:

Re: Iranians discover that finding a needle in a Haystack ain't hard... (Bill Horne)
No dial tone, no service, no respect -- not even for Alexander Graham Bell descendant (Joseph Singer)
Re: No dial tone, no service, no respect -- not even for Alexander Graham Bell descendant (Sam Spade)
History--unlisted number charge(Lisa or Jeff)
Re: History--unlisted number charge(John Levine)
Re: History--old MIT dial-up directory(Lisa or Jeff)
Re: History--old MIT dial-up directory(Richard)
Re: What is a "female-specific mobile handset"?(Richard)
Re: History--old MIT dial-up directory(Robert Bonomi)
Re: History--old MIT dial-up directory(Lisa or Jeff)
Re: What is a "female-specific mobile handset"?(Barry Margolin)
Re: Uptick in do-not-call violations(Hal Murray)
Re: Uptick in do-not-call violations(danny burstein)
Re: Uptick in do-not-call violations(tlvp)
Re: Uptick in do-not-call violations(Richard)


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Date: Thu, 7 Oct 2010 07:38:02 -0400 From: Bill Horne <bill@horneQRM.net> To: telecomdigestmoderator.remove-this@and-this-too.telecom-digest.org. Subject: Re: Iranians discover that finding a needle in a Haystack ain't hard... Message-ID: <E1P3p0S-0004dB-3Q@billhorne.homelinux.org> On Wed, 6 Oct 2010 18:52:02 -0400, danny burstein <dannyb@panix.com> wrote: > [VOA] > > What Went Wrong With Haystack? > > It seemed too good to be true, and perhaps that should have been > the first warning. "Haystack" was said to be just the needed tool > for Iranian democracy activists to break through governmental > firewalls and hide their identity. In the end, it may have put > them at risk. How did the promise of Haystack go so wrong? > -------- > rest (basically that too many people wanted to believe in > the Emperor's new clothes, and almost no one checked first...): > > http://www.voanews.com/english/news/science-technology/What-Went-Wrong-With-Haystack-103708474.html > There was nothing wrong with Haystack: it just never existed. It was an idea borne aloft on the winds of hype, sustained by the breezy publicity of the "once over, lightly" technical press, and finally brought down by a zephyr of reality. Anyone who has dealt with the Iranian police - my cousin was in that country while in the Army - will tell you that they're not the brightest bulbs on the tree. They are however, very effective, with an arsenal that includes pliers, flatirons, and cattle prods. It's ludicrous to think that anyone could "hide" something from them when their first (and, usually, the only needed) response to a computer security problem is rubber-hose cryptography. The "authors" of Haystack are - let's be kind - inexperienced in International Politics. Their time would have been better spent conducting a hunger strike outside the Iranian embassy: perhaps the clarity of starvation would have taught them to start with the basics instead of jumping from supposition to grand scheme. My 2. YMMV. Bill Horne (Filter QRM for direct replies)
Date: Tue, 12 Oct 2010 16:59:40 -0700 (PDT) From: Joseph Singer <joeofseattle@yahoo.com> To: telecomdigestmoderator.remove-this@and-this-too.telecom-digest.org. Subject: No dial tone, no service, no respect -- not even for Alexander Graham Bell descendant Message-ID: <567696.48681.qm@web52707.mail.re2.yahoo.com> Her telephone died weeks ago. Since then, Helene Pancoast has been engaged in a farcical struggle familiar to any no-account customer up against an errant provider of cable, gas, electricity or telephone service. You know the feeling. Like wandering through a maze. Reduced to communicating with robotic voices reciting touch-tone menus of choices that hardly correspond to your particular dilemma. ``Press 3 if your phone is inoperable.'' Finally comes the live voice of a service rep with a tenuous grip on English, who shunts you to another line that kicks you back to the original recording. ``Press 9 if you would like to be transferred to the suicide hot-line.'' Helene Pancoast speaks for all of us, as she bemoans the ``general malaise and disconnection of the service industries of people serving people.'' ``General disregard, for the problems of others and of service to customers and community, has become the norm,'' she complains. WHAT'S IN A NAME Except it's not just you or me who can't convince AT&T to fix the phone. ``My grandmother Marian Bell Fairchild always told us that we should never `use the connection' of the Bell Name to get special attention,'' Pancoast says. A few days ago, in the midst of trying (and failing) to convince a telephone repairman to reconnect her to civilization, she violated grandmother's edict. ``I did mention as well that, as the last remaining Bell descendant living in Miami, I felt their service was beyond terrible.'' The very great granddaughter of Alexander Graham Bell, inventor of the telephone, father of the Bell communications conglomerate known lately as AT&T, can only rage against the machine. http://www.miamiherald.com/2010/10/11/1868716/no-dial-tone-no-service-no-respect.html or http://goo.gl/co0O
Date: Wed, 13 Oct 2010 08:10:04 -0700 From: Sam Spade <sam@coldmail.com> To: telecomdigestmoderator.remove-this@and-this-too.telecom-digest.org. Subject: Re: No dial tone, no service, no respect -- not even for Alexander Graham Bell descendant Message-ID: <Dq-dnR6Sw7FTVijRnZ2dnUVZ_sadnZ2d@giganews.com> Joseph Singer wrote: > Helene Pancoast speaks for all of us, as she bemoans the ``general > malaise and disconnection of the service industries of people serving > people.'' > > ``General disregard, for the problems of others and of service to > customers and community, has become the norm,'' she complains. This is by design. Staffing customer support is not a profit center. Thus, the modern bean counter have convinced management to discourage customers from complaining. ***** Moderator's Note ***** I can't think of a better way to drive customers toward the competition, and I've got an email history with Virgin Mobile to prove it. Does anyone know how to reach Sir Richard Branson? I've got a complaint I want to deliver. Bill Horne Moderator
Date: Tue, 12 Oct 2010 19:05:46 -0700 (PDT) From: Lisa or Jeff <hancock4@bbs.cpcn.com> To: telecomdigestmoderator.remove-this@and-this-too.telecom-digest.org. Subject: History--unlisted number charge Message-ID: <dbdee76d-77e7-4686-a201-269f09224b1a@k10g2000yqa.googlegroups.com> Recently we discussed the current charge to have an unlisted number. I discovered that New York Telephone introduced it in its service area way back in 1959, and it was 50c a month. An article in the NYT said after the fee went in many people went back to having a listed number. In Philadelphia, a charge didn't apply until much, much later. We had a relative living with us and he had his own listing in the phone book under his name (our number); we were charged 50c extra for that. Later on (1980s?) they said a spouse could have his/her own separate listing for free; so anyone could get one free extra listing. At that time they stopped charging us the 50c. I believe it was around then they put in the unlisted charge for the Phila area. Also, DDD was implemented in New York City gradually in the early 1960s. It already had a regional capability to dial short haul toll calls to Long Island, Westchester, and New Jersey. The Bell Labs history shows a picture of an early network control center for the NYC area. DDD required not only the long distance switching capability, but also AMA (automatic message accounting) equipment to record toll calls and later process the recorded tapes for billing. Did the prototype installation at Englewood have AMA? I got the impression AMA came out later.
Date: Wed, 13 Oct 2010 14:18:32 +0000 (UTC) From: John Levine <johnl@iecc.com> To: telecomdigestmoderator.remove-this@and-this-too.telecom-digest.org. Subject: Re: History--unlisted number charge Message-ID: <i94f3o$7us$1@gal.iecc.com> >DDD required not only the long distance switching capability, but also >AMA (automatic message accounting) equipment to record toll calls and >later process the recorded tapes for billing. > >Did the prototype installation at Englewood have AMA? I got the >impression AMA came out later. I recall ONI in that part of New Jersey. You'd dial the call, an operator would come on the line and ask for your number, then the call would go through. My relatives who run a rural telco in Vermont said that in the ONI era they were constantly having to move calls from one account to another due to kids who lied to the ONI operator. R's, John
Date: Tue, 12 Oct 2010 18:59:11 -0700 (PDT) From: Lisa or Jeff <hancock4@bbs.cpcn.com> To: telecomdigestmoderator.remove-this@and-this-too.telecom-digest.org. Subject: Re: History--old MIT dial-up directory Message-ID: <1e5800f5-09c4-43ba-ab9f-109d9446427d@f25g2000yqc.googlegroups.com> On Oct 12, 2:27 pm, bon...@host122.r-bonomi.com (Robert Bonomi) wrote: > The panel phone was one of a handful of 'specialty' telephone sets > that Bell offered -- ones where you shelled out a bunch of money to > 'buy' the phone (actually just the housing), and then paid a > recurring monthly for 'renting' the actual phone mechanism > innards. What, a decade later, was marketed as the (greatly > expanded) 'design-line'. I remember seeing the panel phone in leaflets and in displays. The "design line" phones were more popular, quite a few people had them. I've seen candle sticks, wooden boxes, country junction wall set, circle banana set, french phone. Rotary models showed up at yard sales. There was a flap later on when people thought they had bought the entire phone when all they bought was the housing. But I recall the terms being made quite clear when the phones first came out. Anyway, as divesture approached Bell sold its phones to subscribers for a very low price--and allowed subscribers to exchange an old set for a new one before making the purchase at the used price. So, it wasn't a bad deal. Further, one was buying a real Western Electric built-to-withstand-a-nuclear-attack phone which would last in service far longer than any replacements offered by other companies down the road. > If I'm remembering right (some 45 years later) the 'purchase' price > for that phone was something like $120. Including the > installation. Which was a significant chunk of money in 1964 > dollars. That is a high price. I thought it was rented like most everything else. In our area Trimlines and Princesses went for an extra $1 a month, which wasn't that cheap in 1970 dollars. The early models required a little plug in transformer to power the dial light; later models used LCDs powered by the phone line. The prior occupants of our house had Trimlines all over, so they were wired with a central transformer in the basement and used the yellow/black wires for light power. We didn't use Trimlines so the transformer was unplugged. When I got my own line, they used the yellow/black for that. Actually, I don't particularly care for Trimlines. Today I have to use the tone pad for many calls to businesses, and it is cumbersome to do that on a Trimline with the pad in the handset. But their ringer was nicer sounding than a 500/2500 set.
Date: Wed, 13 Oct 2010 10:02:01 -0700 From: Richard <rng@richbonnie.com> To: telecomdigestmoderator.remove-this@and-this-too.telecom-digest.org. Subject: Re: History--old MIT dial-up directory Message-ID: <e4pbb658f2nfl8t3bu1eeecreeo3b6shb2@4ax.com> On Tue, 12 Oct 2010 18:59:11 -0700 (PDT), Lisa or Jeff <hancock4@bbs.cpcn.com> wrote: >Anyway, as divesture approached Bell sold its phones to subscribers >for a very low price--and allowed subscribers to exchange an old set >for a new one before making the purchase at the used price. So, it >wasn't a bad deal. Further, one was buying a real Western Electric >built-to-withstand-a-nuclear-attack phone which would last in service >far longer than any replacements offered by other companies down the >road. I worked for AT&T at the time of divestiture. Employees were given at no cost up to 2 Western Electric phones currently in their homes. I received stickers to put on the bottoms of my phones to denote that they were now my property. I don't know if the offer included all employees, or just management and engineers (I was one of the latter). Dick
Date: Tue, 12 Oct 2010 19:59:45 -0700 From: Richard <rng@richbonnie.com> To: telecomdigestmoderator.remove-this@and-this-too.telecom-digest.org. Subject: Re: What is a "female-specific mobile handset"? Message-ID: <d18ab61n5gam4k87j25akr85q7ibrf08o8@4ax.com> On Tue, 12 Oct 2010 13:01:34 -0400, April Coffman <april.remove-this@and-this-too.americanclec.com> wrote: > I hope just coloring a phone pink is not the answer, I am a woman who >hates the color pink. I would think making phones smaller so that they >fit better in a woman's hand would be nice, for me some Blackberrys feel >very cumbersome because they are so wide. The other issue I have is >finding headsets that fit my tiny little ears properly (the Jabra 125 >fits well though). > >-April Coffman > Apparently marketers think that women would like an item colored pink. They even make guns with a pink color: http://www.thegunsource.com/category/2580_Pink_Pistols.aspx?w=%2BCJWDALnoPg%3D Richard
Date: Wed, 13 Oct 2010 06:25:21 -0500 From: bonomi@host122.r-bonomi.com (Robert Bonomi) To: telecomdigestmoderator.remove-this@and-this-too.telecom-digest.org. Subject: Re: History--old MIT dial-up directory Message-ID: <p_adnXFiEsK8CijRnZ2dnUVZ_oqdnZ2d@posted.nuvoxcommunications> In article <siegman-E0CD25.09500812102010@BMEDCFSC-SRV02.tufts.ad.tufts.edu>, AES <siegman@stanford.edu> wrote: >In article <4CB3CA0A.6060104@annsgarden.com>, > Neal McLain <nmclain@annsgarden.com> wrote: > >> >> It's easy to criticize the whole modular concept, but if you consider >> the requirements I've noted above, you begin to understand why the >> industry and the FCC chose it. >> > >Interesting to read this add'l information. > >However, I wasn't criticizing the modular concept per se. I was >criticizing the design of the "lever" on the modular connector, which in >many (most?) cases was angled outward pointing back along the cord -- >a perfect "fishhook" to catch on anything it came close to. > >Surely some other "snap-in" design or level design would have possible. Surely it would have. <grin> that said, the answer to why something else wasn't chosen is covered by the (mildly cynical); 'The answer to any question that starts off "Why didn't they.." is always "Money."' -- Maureen Johnson Smith, 'To Sail Beyond The Sunset', by R.A.H. The 'phone cord' -- no longer being permanently attached to either the telephone instrument, or the rest of the premises wiring -- was now being considered as a 'replaceable' element, a "consumable', if you will, rather than part of the durable ('capitalized expense') physical plant. As such, the economic touchstone was 'minimize the amortized cost over the projected lifetime', without requiring any specific guaranteed lifetime. If you can make something for 1/10th the cost (or less) that will deliver a 5-year projected life-span, vs. the traditional '40 years', you go with the low- cost version. The other half of the answer is that in the early 1970s, when the standard was being developed, the 'rats nest' of wiring that commonly exists near the modern phone/computer/fax/scanner/printer/etc. was simply not anticipated. 'In isolation', or in a 'managed' high-density wiring environment (e.g. 'patch-panels', with 'dressed' wiring harnesses). the modular jack works well. The drawbacks of the 'fishhook' as you put it, manifest themselves primarily in _undisciplined_ wiring environments, and it is arguable the problems =there= are more a result of said lack of discipline, rather than any inherent failing if the modular design. The fact is that there are a fairly limited number of ways to make a 'durable' multi-wire connection. you can use 'friction fit', like a standard 120V electrical plug does, but this places requirements on conductor mass and rigidity that are 'far beyond' what is needed for a telephone circuit. use of 'twist-lock' (like a 'BNC' connector) or screw- thread (like a coax TV 'F' connector) has numerous issues -- orientation is problematic for more than a 2-conductor configuration, the connector has to be manufactured as multiple separate/distinct pieces and assembled, building 'flush-mount' jack is tricky (and, on one where the jack pro- trudes, the jack is much more vulnerable to physical damage), etc. This essentially leaves you with the 'spring clip' design, in some form or other. There are only 3 basic ways to build the spring clip -- hinge on the inside end, hinge on the outside end, or hinged/attached on -both- ends, requiring some sort of 'expansion' mechanism. 'Hinged on both ends' is significantly more complicated than a single-ended mechanism. "hinged on the outside" has to either be fairly rigid -- so you can't plug it in without the tab fully depressed -- or you have something that can be plugged in with the tab not engaged, whereupon the tab is acting as a spring to force the plug =out= of the socket. Not a good thing. There is a "possible' alternative -- where the tab lever is 'hinged on the inside', but the outside end is somehow 'contained' (e.g. between a couple of 'walls' or 'boxed in' ) and can't 'snag' things -- but this requires that the 'back side' of the plug extend considerably further out from the surface of the jack. Which makes it much more vulnerable to damage from side blows. "Building a better connector" seems like it should be easy enough -- until you actually try to design it. <wry grin>
Date: Wed, 13 Oct 2010 11:31:02 -0700 (PDT) From: Lisa or Jeff <hancock4@bbs.cpcn.com> To: telecomdigestmoderator.remove-this@and-this-too.telecom-digest.org. Subject: Re: History--old MIT dial-up directory Message-ID: <85caae23-273e-488f-a4d9-0feab3be46a8@k22g2000yqh.googlegroups.com> On Oct 13, 7:25 am, bon...@host122.r-bonomi.com (Robert Bonomi) wrote: > The 'phone cord' -- no longer being permanently attached to either the > telephone instrument, or the rest of the premises wiring -- was now being > considered as a 'replaceable' element, a "consumable', if you will, rather > than part of the durable ('capitalized expense') physical plant. As such, > the economic touchstone was 'minimize the amortized cost over the projected > lifetime', without requiring any specific guaranteed lifetime. If you > can make something for 1/10th the cost (or less) that will deliver a 5-year > projected life-span, vs. the traditional '40 years', you go with the low- > cost version. I suspect that some advocates of Bell System Divesture expected the traditional Bell System heavy-duty standards to continue and that competition would reduce only the price, not the quality. They didn't realize that Divesture would eliminate the economic reasons to build components to last a long time. I also suspect that other advocates of Divesture did understand the economic changes, and saw an opportunity to get in on the action for themselves. That is, they knew they could build telephone components much cheaper than Western Electric had been building them. Thus the market was flooded with cheap phones that broke if you merely hung up too hard or business systems that didn't work very well. Further, as discussed in the past on this newsgroup, some equipment and service vendors were outright dishonest. > The other half of the answer is that in the early 1970s, when the > standard was being developed, the 'rats nest' of wiring that > commonly exists near the modern > phone/computer/fax/scanner/printer/etc. was simply not > anticipated. 'In isolation', or in a 'managed' high-density wiring > environment (e.g. 'patch-panels', with 'dressed' wiring harnesses). > the modular jack works well. The Bell System itself suffered from "rats nests" wiring, particularly in cities where there were constant service changes. In the late 1960s people began to move their location much more frequently and this resulted in central office distrubting frames getting quite messy and backups in executing installation orders. (There were other issues at work as well, such as trouble finding qualified staff in certain areas). In addition, the service panel in larger buildings became quite cluttered. These contributed to the service crisis of that era. A Bell Labs Record article of that era described a new service panel for buildings using pink and blue backplates and other aides to keep wiring clean. However, generally speaking Bell System crews were pretty careful. That was one advantaged of the high-priced network--the crews had the time to spend to do things right. Side note: At a worksite in the 1990s the patch panel had new old- style four prong plugs and jacks for some connections. I was told this was for "test purposes", but I could not find out anything more why they installed something 20 years after it became obsolete.
Date: Wed, 13 Oct 2010 01:37:52 -0400 From: Barry Margolin <barmar@alum.mit.edu> To: telecomdigestmoderator.remove-this@and-this-too.telecom-digest.org. Subject: Re: What is a "female-specific mobile handset"? Message-ID: <barmar-1AC39C.01375213102010@62-183-169-81.bb.dnainternet.fi> In article <4CB4946E.8070704@AmericanCLEC.com>, April Coffman <april.remove-this@and-this-too.americanclec.com> wrote: > I hope just coloring a phone pink is not the answer, I am a woman who > hates the color pink. So? Just because something is female-specific doesn't mean it's expected to be attractive to ALL women. Just more attractive to women in general. By analogy, dresses are female-specific clothing, but there are many women who prefer not to wear dresses. > I would think making phones smaller so that they > fit better in a woman's hand would be nice, for me some Blackberrys feel > very cumbersome because they are so wide. The other issue I have is > finding headsets that fit my tiny little ears properly (the Jabra 125 > fits well though). I expect some of these things are in their mind, too. It could also be marketing differences. There are cigarette brands that are more popular among blacks, yet I assume there's not much difference in the way blacks and whites smoke cigarettes. -- Barry Margolin, barmar@alum.mit.edu Arlington, MA *** PLEASE post questions in newsgroups, not directly to me *** *** PLEASE don't copy me on replies, I'll read them in the group ***
Date: Wed, 13 Oct 2010 00:56:42 -0500 From: hal-usenet@ip-64-139-1-69.sjc.megapath.net (Hal Murray) To: telecomdigestmoderator.remove-this@and-this-too.telecom-digest.org. Subject: Re: Uptick in do-not-call violations Message-ID: <taidndMtSfmH1yjRnZ2dnUVZ_hidnZ2d@megapath.net> >The easiest way to avoid the problem is to avoid being on their list >in the first place. I always lie when banks or other businesses ask >for my phone number: I think that since they're never going to call me >for anything important (_that_ kind of service is gone forever), they >deserve to have their time wasted. I've had legitimate calls from my bank's credit card side. They wanted to know if I had ordered $2K of flowers. Nope. I got a new credit card number out of that one. -- These are my opinions, not necessarily my employer's. I hate spam.
Date: Wed, 13 Oct 2010 14:16:20 +0000 (UTC) From: danny burstein <dannyb@panix.com> To: telecomdigestmoderator.remove-this@and-this-too.telecom-digest.org. Subject: Re: Uptick in do-not-call violations Message-ID: <i94evj$g10$1@reader1.panix.com> In <taidndMtSfmH1yjRnZ2dnUVZ_hidnZ2d@megapath.net> hal-usenet@ip-64-139-1-69.sjc.megapath.net (Hal Murray) writes: >>The easiest way to avoid the problem is to avoid being on their list >>in the first place. I always lie when banks or other businesses ask >>for my phone number: I think that since they're never going to call me >>for anything important (_that_ kind of service is gone forever), they >>deserve to have their time wasted. >I've had legitimate calls from my bank's credit card side. >They wanted to know if I had ordered $2K of flowers. Nope. >I got a new credit card number out of that one. It's bad enough when you forget your anniversary. But it's even worse when, after arranging for the flowers, your memory goes hiccup... -- _____________________________________________________ Knowledge may be power, but communications is the key dannyb@panix.com [to foil spammers, my address has been double rot-13 encoded]
Date: Wed, 13 Oct 2010 03:18:43 -0400 From: tlvp <tPlOvUpBErLeLsEs@hotmail.com> To: telecomdigestmoderator.remove-this@and-this-too.telecom-digest.org. Subject: Re: Uptick in do-not-call violations Message-ID: <op.vkh6lhs1itl47o@acer250.gateway.2wire.net> On Tue, 12 Oct 2010 00:50:19 -0400, after tlvp <tPlOvUpBErLeLsEs@hotmail.com> wrote, Bill Horne as moderator added this > Moderator's Note > The easiest way to avoid the problem is to avoid being on their list > in the first place. I always lie when banks or other businesses ask > for my phone number: I think that since they're never going to call me > for anything important (_that_ kind of service is gone forever), they > deserve to have their time wasted. Actually, several banks do make legitimate use of my phone number, as follows: should they encounter a charge -- or a pattern of charges -- that triggers their "suspicious-activity" flag, they phone me to inquire. If the activity took place at some location far from my home base, they use my cellular number, otherwise they use my home number. I'm always happy to be able either to confirm that yes, that was me, or, in one case, to be able to respond, "No, Good Grief, I did NOT charge anything to any vendor on the Isle of Man, please Refuse That Charge!" Cheers, -- tlvp -- Avant de repondre, jeter la poubelle, SVP
Date: Wed, 13 Oct 2010 10:41:45 -0700 From: Richard <rng@richbonnie.com> To: telecomdigestmoderator.remove-this@and-this-too.telecom-digest.org. Subject: Re: Uptick in do-not-call violations Message-ID: <u1qbb61pp1l5qr3mh6s7teigl8io3clt2d@4ax.com> >***** Moderator's Note ***** > >The easiest way to avoid the problem is to avoid being on their list >in the first place. I always lie when banks or other businesses ask >for my phone number: I think that since they're never going to call me >for anything important (_that_ kind of service is gone forever), they >deserve to have their time wasted. This is very inconsiderate of you. The fake number you enter corresponds to some innocent party who now gets these annoying calls through no fault of his own. I always give my home and mobile phone numbers when opening a checking or a credit card account, so that they can call me in case of trouble, like suspicious charges. I have gotten several calls from Citi Card's suspicious-charge division asking if I had made a particular charge or charges. Most of the time, it was me. But once it wasn't, and they cancelled the account and gave me another number and card. Once, I got a call that I had forgotten my card at a merchant (a large department store) after buying something. The apparently-honest merchant called Citi to report it. Five minutes after the transaction Citi called me on my mobile and told me. I responded that I would return to the store to retrieve my card. They said no, as a precaution they cancelled my number and sent to me a new card by over-night Fedex. Obtelecom (in a way): Several years ago, while reviewing my credit card charges online, I spotted a $25 charge for Internet service in Leningrad, Russia. When I reported it, Citi agreed that it had to be bogus, and that my card had been compomised. They cancelled the charge, closed the account and over-nighted to me a new card. This is a good reason to examine your credit card and checking accounts several times a month. Dick ***** Moderator's Note ***** Give me a little credit: this is, after all, a telecom forum. I give out the busy-test number at a Boston-area CO. Bill Horne Moderator
TELECOM Digest is an electronic journal devoted mostly to telecom- munications topics. It is circulated anywhere there is email, in addition to Usenet, where it appears as the moderated newsgroup 'comp.dcom.telecom'. TELECOM Digest is a not-for-profit, mostly non-commercial educational service offered to the Internet by Bill Horne. All the contents of the Digest are compilation-copyrighted. You may reprint articles in some other media on an occasional basis, but please attribute my work and that of the original author. The Telecom Digest is moderated by Bill Horne. Contact information: Bill Horne Telecom Digest 43 Deerfield Road Sharon MA 02067-2301 781-784-7287 bill at horne dot net Subscribe: telecom-request@telecom-digest.org?body=subscribe telecom Unsubscribe: telecom-request@telecom-digest.org?body=unsubscribe telecom This Digest is the oldest continuing e-journal about telecomm- unications on the Internet, having been founded in August, 1981 and published continuously since then. Our archives are available for your review/research. We believe we are the oldest e-zine/mailing list on the internet in any category! URL information: http://telecom-digest.org Copyright (C) 2009 TELECOM Digest. All rights reserved. Our attorney is Bill Levant, of Blue Bell, PA. --------------------------------------------------------------- Finally, the Digest is funded by gifts from generous readers such as yourself who provide funding in amounts deemed appropriate. Your help is important and appreciated. A suggested donation of fifty dollars per year per reader is considered appropriate. See our address above. Please make at least a single donation to cover the cost of processing your name to the mailing list. All opinions expressed herein are deemed to be those of the author. Any organizations listed are for identification purposes only and messages should not be considered any official expression by the organization.
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