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Message Digest 
Volume 28 : Issue 150 : "text" Format

Messages in this Issue:
  Re: Payphones Re: ANI vs. Caller ID 
  800 GOOG 411  (was: Payphones Re: ANI vs. Caller ID)
  Re: ANI vs. Caller ID 
  Re: ANI vs. Caller ID 
  Re: Texting May Be Taking a Toll 
  Re: Texting May Be Taking a Toll 
  Re: Apt buildings--where is the demarc box?  
  Re: Apt buildings--where is the demarc box? 
  Re: ANI vs. Caller ID 
  Re: ANI vs. Caller ID 
  Re: ANI vs. Caller ID  & Re: [telecom] ANI   vs. Caller ID 
  Re: Apt buildings--where is the demarc box?  
  Re: 1984 All Over Again? 
  Re: OneSuite (was Re: AT&T to discontinue CallVantage voip service)


====== 27 years of TELECOM Digest -- Founded August 21, 1981 ====== Telecom and VOIP (Voice over Internet Protocol) Digest for the Internet. All contents here are copyrighted by Patrick Townson and the individual writers/correspondents. Articles may be used in other journals or newsgroups, provided the writer's name and the Digest are included in the fair use quote. By using -any name or email address- included herein for -any- reason other than responding to an article herein, you agree to pay a hundred dollars to the recipients of the email. =========================== Addresses herein are not to be added to any mailing list, nor to be sold or given away without explicit written consent. Chain letters, viruses, porn, spam, and miscellaneous junk are definitely unwelcome. We must fight spam for the same reason we fight crime: not because we are naive enough to believe that we will ever stamp it out, but because we do not want the kind of world that results when no one stands against crime. Geoffrey Welsh =========================== See the bottom of this issue for subscription and archive details and the name of our lawyer, and other stuff of interest. ---------------------------------------------------------------------- Date: Wed, 03 Jun 2009 06:39:44 GMT From: tlvp <PmUiRsGcE.TtHlEvSpE@att.net> To: redacted@invalid.telecom.csail.mit.edu Subject: Re: Payphones Re: ANI vs. Caller ID Message-ID: <op.uuxrgdsgwqrt3j@acer250.gateway.2wire.net> On Wed, 03 Jun 2009 02:08:37 -0400, tlvp <PmUiRsGcE.TtHlEvSpE@att.net> wrote: > On Sun, 31 May 2009 19:13:42 -0400, <hancock4@bbs.cpcn.com> wrote: > >> On May 31, 7:25am, bon...@host122.r-bonomi.com (Robert Bonomi) wrote: >> >>> If by 'information', you mean what is now called 'directory >>> assistance', >>> with the exception of 800-555-1212, it is to be expected that there >>> would >>> be a payment demand for -that-. "Everybody" charges for Directory >>> assist. >>> calls these days. The third-party pay-phone operators (who place >>> COCOTS >>> that _they_ own on other peoples property) are notorious for having DA, >>> like 'operator-assisted' calls handled by a contracted service of their >>> choice -- with exorbitant rates passed through to the customer. >> >> The other day I was surprised to see not only a public pay phone, but >> a telephone directory in the shelf underneath it. >> >> In the old days most pay phones had phone books with them, some simply >> free standing on a shelf underneath, many in binders attached in >> various ways, from simple chains to pull out levers. Larger banks of >> pay phones had a shelf of several local telephone books. Very large >> banks had many telephone books available. Even as they switched from >> booths to kiosks they provided a shelf for the directory. >> >> I haven't checked lately, but I think the cost of directory assistance >> these days is $1.00; even more from a cell phone ($1.50?). I don't >> know if 1+NPA+555-1212 works anymore or what the charge is for that, >> but local 411 often has national listings. In some places they're >> providing, for a fee, other information too such as yellow pages >> listing, such as restaurants in an area. >> >> I could understand charging when a listing is in the book, but often >> times someone has a new number that isn't available. >> >> (Last night on the train I heard someone use their cell phone to call >> Information, I wonder what it cost.) > > I've heard of -- even tested out -- free, ad-sponsored DA numbers. > Don't recall them exactly now, but they were all, IIRC, of the form: > > string together, in appropriate order, one each of {800 888 877 866], > [free goog], [411]. (Yeah, of the 16 possible combos, only very few > will provide a free DA service -- sorry I don't remember which, if any.] > > Or, by example: > > 800 free 411 (800 3733411) ; 800 411 free (800 3733411) ; > 800 goog 411 (800 4664411) ; 800 411 goog (800 4114664) ; and > > [There are] 12 more, with 888, 877, or 866 in lieu of 800. > > Rather similar to the web URL for free DA another reader posted ;-) . > > Disclaimer: I might be all wet on this ... . > > Cheers, -- tlvp Follow-up: I tested 1 800 373 3411 and 1 800 466 4411 earlier today: the former is laden with adverts, but offers DA, time, and weather; the latter is without adverts, but offers DA only for "businesses" (I tried "Thai restaurants, Connecticut, New Haven" -- it worked well). The other 14 may well be erroneous recollections on my part ... or not. Cheers, -- tlvp ------------------------------ Date: Wed, 3 Jun 2009 09:17:36 +0000 (UTC) From: "Adam H. Kerman" <ahk@chinet.com> To: redacted@invalid.telecom.csail.mit.edu Subject: 800 GOOG 411 (was: Payphones Re: ANI vs. Caller ID) Message-ID: <h05f3f$6f2$1@news.albasani.net> Richard <rng@richbonnie.com> wrote: >I have not tried it, but Google has a 411 service which is free: >http://www.google.com/goog411/ . The demonstration video on this site >does not show any advertising messages on the phone call. The FAQ >says "At this point, we do not have advertising opportunities for this >service." which may mean that after it catches on, they may place ads >on it. I wouldn't mind ads if the service is free to me. As it's Google, one always assumes they are adding to their massive database of personal profiles. Now they know your buying habits, as linked to a particular phone number. Also, they offer to place the call for you, which will undoubtably be recorded then run through voice recognition software. Soon that pizza will be delivered to your door minutes before you start to get really hungry. ------------------------------ Date: Wed, 03 Jun 2009 07:55:38 GMT From: "Tony Toews \[MVP\]" <ttoews@telusplanet.net> To: redacted@invalid.telecom.csail.mit.edu Subject: Re: ANI vs. Caller ID Message-ID: <0uac25l7orl607oq7pddiq3noqvb93e13s@4ax.com> Steven Lichter <diespammers@ikillspammers.com> wrote: >> Which then leads to the exorbitant rates that hotels in city centres >> charge for local and long distance phone calls. I wonder just how >> much revenue they are really getting given that folks who are staying >> in such almost certainly all have cell phones. > >Why would you stay in Seattle when Microsoft is located in Redmond; >across the bay, that is unless you are working in downtown. Depends on the event. If I'm there for a small meeting I stay in Redmond. But when it's an MVP Summit with 1500 folks then MS has to use downtown hotels due to sheer logistics of moving enough people around with coaches from a minimum of sites. Some days are held in the downtown conference centre so we usually just walk there. Others they move us to the MS campus in Redmond. Tony -- Tony Toews, Microsoft Access MVP Tony's Main MS Access pages - http://www.granite.ab.ca/accsmstr.htm Tony's Microsoft Access Blog - http://msmvps.com/blogs/access/ Granite Fleet Manager http://www.granitefleet.com/ ------------------------------ Date: Wed, 3 Jun 2009 12:44:15 -0700 (PDT) From: Joseph Singer <joeofseattle@yahoo.com> To: redacted@invalid.telecom.csail.mit.edu Subject: Re: ANI vs. Caller ID Message-ID: <719709.80070.qm@web52707.mail.re2.yahoo.com> Fri, 29 May 2009 05:40:13 GMT <ttoews@telusplanet.net> wrote: > Then I'm trying to visit my brother at his new house in an > unfamiliar city. I dial his number in with a wrong digit while I'm > driving. (Yes, I know I shouldn't and I seldom use the phone while > driving. I'm pretty sure I was at a red light. Does that satisfy > you?) > Call goes to voice mail and I realize it's not my brothers phone. > So at the next red light I re-enter my brothers phone number. While > I'm doing that the person at the wrong number phones me and ask if I > called her. I'm thinking to myself "You just cost me $0.55 on my > prepaid cell phone to prove you're an @#$%$ idiot." $0.30 per > minute network useage and $0.35 long distance. I politely told her > that I had called a wrong number and hung up. I do wish that cell > phones had a slaml-the-handset noise feature though. Let me get this: You dialed a wrong number (while driving.) The person who you called calls you back to inquire what you wanted by calling them. Then *you* are mad because they cost you money by calling you back. I'm trying to understand who's at fault here. Is it the person who dialed the wrong number or the person who called the wrong number caller back? It seems to me the courteous thing to do would be to explain that you called the number in error, [which you did,] and let it go at that. ------------------------------ Date: Wed, 03 Jun 2009 17:57:27 +1000 From: David Clayton <dcstar@myrealbox.com> To: redacted@invalid.telecom.csail.mit.edu Subject: Re: Texting May Be Taking a Toll Message-ID: <pan.2009.06.03.07.57.26.268027@myrealbox.com> On Wed, 03 Jun 2009 02:00:01 -0400, John Mayson wrote: > On Mon, Jun 1, 2009 at 11:17 PM, Monty Solomon <monty@roscom.com> wrote: >> >> The phenomenon is beginning to worry physicians and psychologists, who >> say it is leading to anxiety, distraction in school, falling grades, >> repetitive stress injury and sleep deprivation. > > As the father of teens I really wonder where these studies come from. Yes, > they send a lot of texts. But I simply don't see any of the above > symptoms. Perhaps some teenagers are already prone to such issues and > texting is just the latest scapegoat? I've heard everything from video > games to heavy metal lyrics to Internet usage being blamed. What will we > blame five years from now? > If you were getting bombarded with advertising/information from so many diverse - and increasingly intrusive - sources these days, I reckon you'd be suffering similar symptoms eventually. Maybe with the current acceleration of data overload from so many sources we are seeing more and more people suffering from it? If you accept the theory that the human brain has finite capacities for absorbing, processing and storing information, then having an ever increasing amount of information to process - via our lovely technology - must mean we can only devote a smaller amount of that resource to the increased quantity? Will our modern technology eventually cause our brains to explode, or (as in the "Hitch-hikers Guide to the Galaxy") will it just keep us constantly occupied so we don't have to bother to actually think any more? :-) If certain people start using a phone that cannot be turned off as a method of torture to obtain information, then we'll know for sure that things have gone too far....... -- Regards, David. David Clayton Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. Knowledge is a measure of how many answers you have, intelligence is a measure of how many questions you have. ------------------------------ Date: Wed, 03 Jun 2009 08:11:03 GMT From: "Tony Toews \[MVP\]" <ttoews@telusplanet.net> To: redacted@invalid.telecom.csail.mit.edu Subject: Re: Texting May Be Taking a Toll Message-ID: <d6bc2555fhj7itqfkgv58p66cn65tdvfbf@4ax.com> John Mayson <john@mayson.us> wrote: >As the father of teens I really wonder where these studies come from. >Yes, they send a lot of texts. But I simply don't see any of the >above symptoms. Perhaps some teenagers are already prone to such >issues and texting is just the latest scapegoat? I've heard >everything from video games to heavy metal lyrics to Internet usage >being blamed. What will we blame five years from now? Given that I'm of a certain age I recall similar comments about the Beatles and Elvis Presley. And read a newspaper from 1890. Not 1990 but a century before that. Remarkable how similar the comments about the youth back then. That said I have a big problem with texting and driving. Or chatting on the cell phone and driving. (Well, unless you're in a traffic jam. And not just a red light.) Small town RCMP had a call a while back about a possible drunk driver. Turns out she was texting while driving. At night. On a two lane road with no shoulders. Over 20 years ago when the first hand held cell phones came out I knew there would be a problem. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Motorola_DynaTAC I'm waiting at a four way stop with a flashing red light in an industrial sub division. I see a vehicle coming from the right which isn't slowing down. As he zooms through the intersection I honk. He gives me the finger. Tony -- Tony Toews, Microsoft Access MVP Tony's Main MS Access pages - http://www.granite.ab.ca/accsmstr.htm Tony's Microsoft Access Blog - http://msmvps.com/blogs/access/ Granite Fleet Manager http://www.granitefleet.com/ ------------------------------ Date: Wed, 3 Jun 2009 09:37:17 +0000 (UTC) From: "Adam H. Kerman" <ahk@chinet.com> To: redacted@invalid.telecom.csail.mit.edu Subject: Re: Apt buildings--where is the demarc box? Message-ID: <h05g8d$8ag$1@news.albasani.net> hancock4@bbs.cpcn.com wrote: >In apartment, condo, and co-op multi-family buildings there is often >no individual "demarc" box for individual units. Rather, the lines >consolidate in large junction boxes which are maintained by the >telco. All an individual unit has is a plain phone jack. Those junction boxes would be the end of telephone company wire. >In the event there is trouble on the line where is the 'cut off' point >to determine responsibility for repair? To the subscriber, the cut >off point would appear to be in their own apt since they obviously >don't have (nor should have) access to the central junction box. Between the point the wire enters the apartment and the jacks, that wire is a fixture of the apartment. Between the telco box and the apartment is "building wire", a fixture of the building. If the apartment is a condominium, the building wire would be a limited common element. For all practical purposes, wire maintenance of inside wire and building wire is the subscriber's responsibility, but he may need to give the building owner some notice that he needs access to wiring panels in utility rooms. In a condo, maintenance of building wire will definitely be charged back to the unit owner. In a leased or rented unit, it depends on contract language, but ultimately, the tenant pays. The ripoff inside wire maintenance plan from the phone company doesn't necessarily cover building wire. ------------------------------ Date: Wed, 3 Jun 2009 15:41:20 +0000 (UTC) From: David Lesher <wb8foz@panix.com> To: redacted@invalid.telecom.csail.mit.edu Subject: Re: Apt buildings--where is the demarc box? Message-ID: <h065j0$l1a$2@reader1.panix.com> "Adam H. Kerman" <ahk@chinet.com> writes: >>In apartment, condo, and co-op multi-family buildings there is often >>no individual "demarc" box for individual units. Rather, the lines >>consolidate in large junction boxes which are maintained by the >>telco. All an individual unit has is a plain phone jack. >Those junction boxes would be the end of telephone company wire. That depends on where. In about 20-25 states, the demark is in the apartment. There was a shim built to fit behind a 2554 wallset. At the bottom, it had a modular jack and plug. THAT was the demark point. -- A host is a host from coast to coast.................wb8foz@nrk.com & no one will talk to a host that's close........[v].(301) 56-LINUX Unless the host (that isn't close).........................pob 1433 is busy, hung or dead....................................20915-1433 ------------------------------ Date: Wed, 3 Jun 2009 07:00:54 -0700 (PDT) From: hancock4@bbs.cpcn.com To: redacted@invalid.telecom.csail.mit.edu Subject: Re: ANI vs. Caller ID Message-ID: <38d77441-eed5-41b6-aac5-180e8ed95ba1@z7g2000vbh.googlegroups.com> On Jun 3, 2:00am, gordonb.z9...@burditt.org (Gordon Burditt) wrote: > Do carriers have any immunity against lawsuits for incorrect or > spoofed caller-ID when their marketing department makes no mention > of this? (assuming, for the moment, that they can't lay it off on > some OTHER telco providing the bad information). Consider a > worst-case situation, where the lawsuit is a wrongful death suit, > and the one (suspected of) spoofing the caller-ID is a homicidal > stalker, who only managed to get through because of spoofed caller-ID. > I think a case could happen where it seems quite plausible that the > telco is responsible. As far as I know, carriers have no immunity. In your scenario I would think all telcos involved would be found liable. In matters where personal safety is compromised by a false claim, such as from stalkers and robbers, juries can be rather sympathetic. In the early years of cellphones, someone was attacked and their cellphone couldn't get through to the police. They sued over false advertising claims. I believe after that cell phones included 'softening' adjectives. I think a greater chance would be trouble from the FTC (or FCC) for selling a false claim. I would guess telcos want to keep the spoofing and fudging as quiet as possible so as not discourage subscribers from buying caller-ID service and from them spending any money to fix the problems. As an aside, I think many carriers have migrated premium services like Caller-ID over to the 'unregulated' side so the PUC/FCC no longer has jurisdiction. My guess is the telcos will add some fine print to cover their butts. My hope is that the govt will set a policy outlawing spoofing and go after those who violate it. I also hope the govt will continue to go after illicit telemarketers as described early in this discussion; and not wait until the violations are so enormous. A lot of players know as long as they don't push it too far they can get away with stuff. ------------------------------ Date: Wed, 03 Jun 2009 13:41:26 -0500 From: bonomi@host122.r-bonomi.com (Robert Bonomi) To: redacted@invalid.telecom.csail.mit.edu Subject: Re: ANI vs. Caller ID Message-ID: <hv6dnTfi2K1LXrvXnZ2dnUVZ_tCdnZ2d@posted.nuvoxcommunications> In article <V_SdnXmdXOvKJLnXnZ2dnUVZ_oSdnZ2d@posted.internetamerica>, Gordon Burditt <gordonb.z9cw5@burditt.org> wrote: >>But it is also true that due to the increased spoofing of caller-ID >>plus failure to send anything ("111-111-1111"), subscribers will get >>upset they're not getting what they've paid for. This will lead to >>lost revenue as subscribers disconnect the service or disconnect the >>provider altogether out of frustration. (It may not be the provider's >>fault, but they'll get blamed for it just the same.) It's also >>possible there could be nasty litigation against a carrier by a >>subscriber or regulatory agency. > >Do carriers have any immunity against lawsuits for incorrect or >spoofed caller-ID when their marketing department makes no mention >of this? (assuming, for the moment, that they can't lay it off on >some OTHER telco providing the bad information). Consider a >worst-case situation, where the lawsuit is a wrongful death suit, >and the one (suspected of) spoofing the caller-ID is a homicidal >stalker, who only managed to get through because of spoofed caller-ID. >I think a case could happen where it seems quite plausible that the >telco is responsible. > Can you find _any_ representation, anywhere, that the telco promises that the information *is* accurate? <wry grin> _Some_ telcos that have customers who have the capabilities to supply their own caller-id data *do* filter the customer-supplied data against the telco's understanding of what numbers that customer has/owns. Others do _not_. They don't see a reason to spend the money for something that brings _them_ "little to no" benefit, as they see things. As long as _anybody_ allows non-trustworthy data into the system/network, *nobody* can =rely= on the data provided to be accurate. Sad, but true, nonetheless. ------------------------------ Date: Wed, 3 Jun 2009 15:32:53 +0000 (UTC) From: David Lesher <wb8foz@panix.com> To: redacted@invalid.telecom.csail.mit.edu Subject: Re: ANI vs. Caller ID & Re: [telecom] ANI vs. Caller ID Message-ID: <h06535$l1a$1@reader1.panix.com> "Dr. Barry L. Ornitz" <BLOrnitz48@charter.net> writes: >Just to give some numbers, at 3 GHz the dielectric constant and loss >tangent of water, ice and wood are: > Dielectric Constant Loss Tangent >Ice (distilled water) 3.2 0.0009 >Water ( 0 C) 88.0 0.157 >Water ( 20 C) 80.4 0.157 >Water (100 C) 55.3 0.157 Which, BTW, is why "defrost" in a microwave oven is so slow. The ice absorbs zip; so the oven cooks a second, warming the food surface, pausing to let the adjacent water melt. Then another second of power, heating that water so it melts more water, and so forth... -- A host is a host from coast to coast.................wb8foz@nrk.com & no one will talk to a host that's close........[v].(301) 56-LINUX Unless the host (that isn't close).........................pob 1433 is busy, hung or dead....................................20915-1433 ------------------------------ Date: Wed, 03 Jun 2009 13:29:16 -0500 From: bonomi@host122.r-bonomi.com (Robert Bonomi) To: redacted@invalid.telecom.csail.mit.edu Subject: Re: Apt buildings--where is the demarc box? Message-ID: <OeWdnWGoJolhXbvXnZ2dnUVZ_s2dnZ2d@posted.nuvoxcommunications> In article <2416a705-b45a-415f-89a0-5bfa434e4c22@o20g2000vbh.googlegroups.com>, <hancock4@bbs.cpcn.com> wrote: >In apartment, condo, and co-op multi-family buildings there is often >no individual "demarc" box for individual units. Rather, the lines >consolidate in large junction boxes which are maintained by the >telco. All an individual unit has is a plain phone jack. > >In the event there is trouble on the line where is the 'cut off' point >to determine responsibility for repair? To the subscriber, the cut >off point would appear to be in their own apt since they obviously >don't have (nor should have) access to the central junction box. > >Thanks. > >(Any other information about line maintenance in multi-family housing >would be appreciated.) > Authoritative answer: "It depends". on -where- the state regulatory authorities said it is. In a number of jurisdictions, the telco is responsible *ONLY* to the point where their big multi-pair cable terminates inside the _building_. The the building management is responsible for the 'house' wiring to the individual units, and the unit is responsible for the wiring inside their premises. In such situations, when there's a building wire problem, you are at the mercy of whomever the building's "selected contractor" is, for length of time, and price you'll have to pay, to get the problem fixed. In other jurisdictions, the telco is liable up to the point the wiring enters the unit itself. ------------------------------ Date: Wed, 03 Jun 2009 10:23:01 -0700 From: Bruce L.Bergman <bruceNOSPAMbergman@gmail.com> To: redacted@invalid.telecom.csail.mit.edu Subject: Re: 1984 All Over Again? Message-ID: <40ad255pt6pig08s0erilb52kuc6mfjlk3@4ax.com> On Mon, 1 Jun 2009 11:42:47 -0400 (EDT), David Clayton <dcstar@myrealbox.com> wrote: >On Sun, 31 May 2009 19:01:50 -0400, Robert Neville wrote: > >> Wow... I feel like I'm caught in a time warp. For the past few weeks, >> there's been nothing but technical discussions about network operations >> and telecom systems here. No political rants. No social appeals.Granted, >> mostly historical telecom systems, but still... > >And speaking of Telco issues, what is the situation in the US with people >using VoIP and getting the dial-tone cut from their ADSL link? > >Such things are becoming quite popular here in Australia, and the >incumbent land-line telco here (Telstra) is starting to take a significant >hit to their revenues. I will always keep at least one line on Legacy Copper for emergency service reliability. One voice line on Copper all the way back to the Central Office so the alarm system dialer can always get to the Central Station receiver, and when you need to dial 911 there will most likely be working dialtone there. Fiber and CATV Coax systems can NOT meet even a four-nines reliability, let alone five. Both services are dependent on utility power at the customer end point AND at several amplifiers and repeaters and concentrator cabinets along the way. Backup batteries only last so long, and they dont have enough portable generators to cover them all. They would have to park a craft truck with a generator set at each point. --<< Bruce >>-- ***** Moderator's Note ***** Copper isn't a panacea: it's trivial to disconnect a copper POTS line before entering a home, thus disabling any "dial in" burglar alarm system. Bill Horne Temporary Moderator ------------------------------ Date: Wed, 3 Jun 2009 13:15:59 -0700 (PDT) From: Joseph Singer <joeofseattle@yahoo.com> To: redacted@invalid.telecom.csail.mit.edu Subject: Re: OneSuite (was Re: AT&T to discontinue CallVantage voip service) Message-ID: <918245.3183.qm@web52707.mail.re2.yahoo.com> Tue, 2 Jun 2009 00:38:13 -0700 (PDT) <zzaldy@gmail.com> wrote: > You may want to check out Onesuite.com pay as you go VoIP service. > It's $2.95 monthly for the service that includes free incoming calls > and a phone number. If you want to use your previous number then > porting is free. Outgoing rate is 2.5 cents to a US number and 1.9 > cents to Canadian numbers. Something I've never understood is pricing for OneSuite. I note that making calls to US numbers is 2.5 cents/minute, 1.9 cents/minute to Canada and 2.4 cents/minute to call Israel. Why would it be cheaper to make a call to Canada or to Israel than it would be to make a domestic US call? ------------------------------ TELECOM Digest is an electronic journal devoted mostly to telecom- munications topics. It is circulated anywhere there is email, in addition to Usenet, where it appears as the moderated newsgroup 'comp.dcom.telecom'. TELECOM Digest is a not-for-profit, mostly non-commercial educational service offered to the Internet by Patrick Townson. All the contents of the Digest are compilation-copyrighted. You may reprint articles in some other media on an occasional basis, but please attribute my work and that of the original author. The Telecom Digest is currently being moderated by Bill Horne while Pat Townson recovers from a stroke. Contact information: Bill Horne Telecom Digest 43 Deerfield Road Sharon MA 02067-2301 781-784-7287 bill at horne dot net Subscribe: telecom-request@telecom-digest.org?body=subscribe telecom Unsubscribe: telecom-request@telecom-digest.org?body=unsubscribe telecom This Digest is the oldest continuing e-journal about telecomm- unications on the Internet, having been founded in August, 1981 and published continuously since then. Our archives are available for your review/research. We believe we are the oldest e-zine/mailing list on the internet in any category! URL information: http://telecom-digest.org Copyright (C) 2008 TELECOM Digest. All rights reserved. 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